4.19.01 Guidelines How to Conduct a CLUP Field Survey

Mon, 11/26/2007 - 19:25

Objective
The objective for the survey is to locate (or verify) features that cannot be traced from the secondary source data (aerial photos, old maps, etc.) that are available in the planning office.

However, it is not only the physical location of a feature that should be recorded during the field survey. The completeness and accuracy of the databases found in the municipal office can also be validated on site, and other useful information about the table objects can also be gathered. For example, when the location of a school site is captured using a handheld GPS, photos of the school buildings are taken, and data about the school facilities such as actual number of classrooms can be listed at the same time. The conditions of the premises can be also be assessed and documented.

Hence, the survey must be properly planned at the office before fieldwork is conducted, and cooperative efforts by the planner and ‘sector custodians’ should be encouraged. As explained earlier, the data captured during the field trip is not only for the for the CLUP preparation, but will also be useful for other (sector) purposes, like project planning, maintenance programs, etc.

Preparation:
1 Prepare a ‘CLUP Directory Tree’ (if this has not has been done before) for the files which will be the result of the survey, copy and paste the sample directory found in the Toolbox into/create a file structure as recommended in Chapter 5.01.01 on the designated drive of the computer that will be the ‘home’ for the GIS data. Screen dump of the CLUP Directory tree here!
2 Copy the field survey form for spatial objects from Chapter 6.04 and print out enough forms to be used during the field survey. The idea is to use the form for each feature (schools, barangay offices, health clinics, etc.) and manually insert the GPS recordings and identification numbers for photos;
3 Copy from Chapter 5 and paste the head column from the Excel Table Object sheets of each object that is relevant for the respective municipality/city. For reference and selection, see the CLUP Metadata Index sheet (Chapter 5.01.01 ‘Quicklook.xls/index’) to find out what table objects are mandatory and what objects are extensive objects. Note that each object should be found in a separate Excel file.
4 Name the respective table object file according to the CLUP coding standard, which is found in the CLUP Metadata in the respective table object sheet ;
5 In the respective LGU sector offices archive, check the availability of data which is required to insert in the CLUP table object. The best way to do this is to invite the ‘LGU sector data custodians’ to report their versions of what is available in-house in order to find out if the field survey could be used to make up the existing databases. (Photo of a meeting with LGU staff working maps and tables.)
6 Make paper copies of the table object files for which the field survey can contribute and bring together with the CLUP Metadata.  
7 Make a route plan for the survey using for example a large size paper version of the old CLUP General (or Urban) Plan:
The Survey Team The recommended composition of the Survey Team is as follows:
A Team Leader (could be one the mentioned below)  
A GPS and Camera Operator (Picture of an equipped (and smiling) Team in front of a vehicle)
A Data Capturer who keeps the record  
A Driver  
In case the field survey is used to update existing table object dataset found in office, staff from the respective LGU sector department is recommended to join the team.  
Survey Equipment:
A vehicle. Sometimes a motorcycle can be useful if the features to record are found in remote areas with poor roads.  
A handheld GPS and don’t forget batteries in case there is no car charger for the GPS.  
A digital camera.  
Al types of maps and aerial photos useful to track locations.  
A compass and a tape meter  
White paint to mark ‘beacons’  
The Survey Forms indicated above  
Examples on How Surveys Can Be Conducted:
Example 1: Feature objects of the Base Map data which normally cannot be traced from secondary sources (an aerial photos, etc.)
In this case, it will be Administrative features linked to the table object‘ Administration’
And a couple of landmarks linked to the table object Cultural Heritage’
Go to the site, take GPS readings, take photos, interview resource persons (if available) and try to complete the indicators defined in the tables. Try to use the same place for the GPS reading, for example always at the entrance gate of the Barangay Hall compound or outside entrance to the Barangay Hall. (Picture exemplifying)
Example 2: Feature object of CLUP Sector data which normally cannot be traced from secondary sources (such as aerial photos, etc.)
In this case, it will be Health Facilities features linked to the table object Facilities by Type and Ownership
…and table object Facility by Capacity and Condition
Go to the site, take GPS readings, take photos, interview resource persons (if available) and try to complete the indicators defined in the tables. Try to use the same place for the GPS reading, for example always at the entrance gate of a school. (Picture exemplifying)
  The next step will be to enter the data into the CLUP GIS at the office, assign proper symbology and color coding to the feature
Note that Examples 1 and 2 can be surveyed at the same time
Example 3: A Business Permit survey for a block in a CBD, zoned as Commercial???
In this case it will be features linked to the table object ‘Business Permits, Year ????’
Take GPS readings of the 4(?) corners of the block  
Take GPS readings of each business activity going on, starting in the NW corner go to NE to SE to SW and back to NW. If it involves multistory activities start with the ground level activity and record upwards What about the street vendors, do they also have a business permit? If so are they assigned to a specified location? If so they have to be recorded as well.
Take photo of the business activities following the GPS readings and record the photo serial number in the Survey form
Back at office, compare the municipal Business Permit Register with the survey, use the Business Permit Register ID as the unique ID and copy/paste the data into the CLUP format
  (Example of a scanned business permit register here!)
Note that is important to behave discreetly in the data capturing activity to avoid giving a negative impression of the exercise. (e.g. GPS position on the other side and always a ‘tourist’ placed in front of the camera!) If the purpose of your activities is asked, always keep an official ID card.

The next step will be to enter the data into the CLUP GIS at the office, assign proper symbology and color coding to the feature
See Chapter… for a more in depth case study of this subject.

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