7. Training

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7.01 GIS Training, Agenda and Course Documentation

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7.01.02

Test


7.02 Training Matrix

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7.03 Tutorials on Some GIS Operations

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7.03.01 Georeferencing Tutorial

7.03.02 How To Create Shapefiles

    In this exercise we will create a new shapefile from scratch. This new shapefile will be joined with attribute data in tutorial 7.03.03

Getting started

  1. Start ArcMap. A window with three alternatives appears. (See image below.) Choose A new empty map. Click OK.

  2. Start ArcCatalog by clicking on the ArcCatalog button in the toolbar. The ArcCatalog window appears.

  3. Navigate to the C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\01_SE\ folder in the catalog tree.

    Creating New Shapefile

  4. From the ArcCatalog menu bar, select File > New > Shapefile… (see image below).

  5. The Create New Shapefile window appears (see image below). In the Name field type ‘SE20_SchCap08’. Choose Point in the Feature Type dropdown list .

  6. Click Edit to define the shapefile’s coordinate system. The Properties for Spatial Reference window opens.

  7. Click Select. The Browse for Coordinate System window appears. Navigate to the Geographic Coordinate System/Asia/ folder. Select Luzon 1911.prj, click Add. Back in the Properties for Spatial Reference window, click Apply, then OK.

    When the Properties for Spatial Reference window first opened, three alternatives were given: Select; Import; New. A smooth way to set the coordinate systems is to use the Import alternative. You will browse to an already existing shape-file and copy its spatial properties to the new shapefile. In the best case scenario a CLUP dataset collection will only consist of dataset in the same coordinate system and the Import alternative will be very easy. In other cases you must of course be aware of and choose a shapefile with the correct spatial settings.

  8. Click OK. The new shapefile is created.

    Adding Field to the Shapefile

  9. We will later join attribute data to this shapefile. In order to prepare for this we need to create an index column – or field - that corresponds to the template found in Chapter 5. Right-click on the shapefile in the catalog tree, then select Properties. The Shapefile Properties window appears.

  10. Go to the Fields tab, see image below. Click on an empty row in the Field Name column and type ‘SCH_ID’ as the name of the new field. Select Long Integer from the Data Type drop list. In the Length field under Field Properties type 10. Now click Apply and then OK.

    You are done with this exercise.


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7.03.03 Create Attribute Table in Excel and Join in the GIS Software

In this exercise we will build up an attribute table for a planning subject and make necessary arrangements so the data can be linked to the features of the subject on the map in the GIS software.

ARRANGING THE DATA

Keywords: Excel, dBASE

Software: Excel, ArcGIS 8/9.x

Preconditions: Folder directories for the CLUP has been created previously; see 3.04.02 Data Preparation for more information. The data to be encoded has been gathered from the field. Spatial layers needed have been prepared beforehand.

The building up of the attribute data will be done in Excel.

The ‘Instructions’ sheet in Quick Look gives you information what to consider at data gathering and where to find the templates you need for the specific table.

From these instructions this table IS01 is defined as a Key table meaning that all LGU’s should prepare it for analysis purposes in the CLUP. However, some of the columns (“A”) might have a light yellow colored background (meaning the data is “Optional”) as opposed to the light green colored columns (it is a “Required” data). In the example below which describes segments in a road network, the data for ‘width’ (of the road) column may not be required if it is very hard to get. Each column has corresponding codes (“B”) for the Field Names.

The data to be encoded for the respective road segment is (hopefully) prepared by the caretaker of the municipal road management (the Engineering Department). He/she is the custodian of the attribute data and in this case he/she has managed to get the data. On the other hand, if in case the road has no individual name, that column is blank. So the populated dataset to start from will look something like this:

The data to be encoded for the respective road segment is (hopefully) prepared by the caretaker of the municipal road management (the Engineering Department). He/she is the custodian of the attribute data and in this case he/she has managed to get the data. On the other hand, if in case the road has no individual name, that column is blank. So the populated dataset to start from will look something like this:

For example, you can see that the road segment with ID 101 is a municipal road, has a gravel surface and is in a poor condition.

The next step is to convert the file to dBase format. Unfortunately dBase is an old MS Dos format which means that the dataset must be very ‘clean and appropriate’ to be used.

In the example below the data has been encoded already digitally so there is an opportunity to start from that. If the data is still in a paper format, it is recommended to use the GIS Table to encode the data and save it in dBase format. (How to will be explained later).

Highlight and copy the cells that should be found in the dBase file:

Open a new Excel file and paste in cell A1. Save the file with a filename in the specific CLUP GIS folder as recommended in the Quick Look.

Before saving the file in dBase format, some pointers are needed to be remembered:

The field name of each column must be in a single cell dBase format. Highlight the column head and do procedures A, B and C to format the field name:

Only one sheet is allowed in dBase. Remove sheet 2 by right clicking on the flip and choosing delete. Do the same procedure with sheet 3:

Highlight the cells with the information, then from the File menu select Save As…, navigate to the CLUP directory, (1) locate the specific sector you are working on and into the GIS folder. (2) In the Save as type select dBase4 format and (3) type the name of the file preferably the same as the Excel file:

Click Save:

A Dialogue box will appear, informing you to save only the active sheet.

Click OK:

Another Dialogue box will appear asking if you want to keep the workbook in its existing format.

Click exit (1) and Yes (2)

A Dialog box will appear asking if you want to save changes you made to the file.
Click YES.

Again the Dialog box informing you that the only one to be saved is the active sheet will appear.

Click OK again.

Then a another Dialog box informing you that the file may contain features that are not compatible with DBF 4 (dBASE IV) and asking if you want to keep the workbook in that format.

Just click YES.

Please remember to have Excel closed when you work with ArcView.
If you want to revise a .dbf file you should close ArcView before you open Excel.
Now it is time to join the attribute data with the shape file you have made for the road:
Open ArcView and open the project you were working on before. Right click on the road layer and select ‘Join…’:

  1. Id’ was the column head or field name where you encoded the unique IDs for the road segments.

  2. IS01_RdYr’ is the name of the dBase table you have prepared that contains the attribute information of the road segments.

  3. RD_ID’ is the field name of the column where the unique ID has been encoded.

  4. Click OK

Let’s see how the table looks like by opening the Attribute Table.

The columns from the dbf table have been integrated into the road segment table:

To make it easier to read we need to hide some columns and give proper alias. Right click on the file name and select ‘Properties…’:

Select Field. Select name by name (A), un tic if it should not be visible (B), if it will be kept visible type an alias in the box (C) and click OK (D):

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7.03.04 Buffering Tutorial

Disclaimer: The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar with the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

Introduction

The objectives of this exercise are to arrange layers properly and to use the buffer wizard to create a buffer. The scenario is to prepare an analysis based on right of way for existing and planned electrical transmission lines and try to identify eventual conflicts to existing land-use, urban areas in particular.

1 Getting started
1.1 Open ArcMap. Select the A New empty map option.
1.2Click on to add the IS17_Tl2007 (transmission lines) layer to the work space. It is found in C:/ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA/02_IS/ folder. Click Add.

Also add some base map features from the C:/ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA/00_BM/ folder such as barangays_bndry, Lake and Roads. To identify conflicts with residential/urban areas we need to add a land use layer. Add the LM01_ExiLu2007 layer from the /04_LM/ folder.

1.3 Rename the IS17_TI2007 layer to Transmission Lines. To do this, right-click on the layer in the table of content, select Properties. The Layer Properties window opens. Go to the General tab and type the new name in the Layer name field. (See image below.) Click OK. (You can also click on the layer in the table of content and type the new layer in the table of content without opening the Layer Properties window.)

1.4 Also rename LM01_ExiLu2007 to ‘Land use’ and barangays_bndry to ‘Barangay boundaries’. (Repeat step 1.3 on these layers.)
1.5In the menu bar click File > Save As… to save a map document as buffering_v1 in /CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA/06_Workfolder/. Don’t forget to save your progress now and then throughout the exercise.
2 Applying Symbology
2.1First of all arrange the layers in the following order (from top to bottom): Transmission lines, Roads, Barangay boundaries, Land use and Lake. Simply drag the layers in the table of content so that they are positioned in the correct order.
2.2Open the Layer Properties window (refer to step 1.3 if you forgot how to do this) and go to the Symbology tab for the Transmission Lines layer.
See image below. At the left, click on Categories and click Unique values, many fields. Then choose TL_VOLT from the first Value Fields list menu and TL_NAME from the second Value Fields list menu. Click the Add All Values button.

2.3Uncheck the symbol for . Place the cursor over the words TL_VOLT, TL_NM in the Label-column. Click once. You can now edit the label to ‘Voltage (kV):’. In the same way rename the label for 230, Planned 2008 to ‘230 (planned’). Delete the comma after 69, 230 and 500. Click Apply.
2.4Now right-click on 500 (in the Value column), select Properties for selected Symbol(s). The Symbol Selector window will open. (see image below). Click More symbols and select Forestry. To the left, search and select the T23 Pipeline 2 symbol. Choose width 9,00. Click OK.

2.5(Back in the Layer Properties window, click Apply if you want to update the map.) Repeat step 2.4 on the other categories (other voltage). Use the same symbol but the size ‘7,00’ for 230 and 230 (Planned) and size ‘5,00’ for 69. Click Apply.
2.6To be able to separate the planned distribution lines from the already existing ones, open the Symbol Selector window for 230 (Planned) once more. Click Properties. The Symbol Property Editor window appears. In the Layers box at bottom-left, select the line symbol (see image below).

2.7Select Simple Line Symbol from the Type list menu. The settings in the window changes to Simple line. From the Style list menu, select Dotted, as seen in the image below.

2.8Click OK and OK again.
2.9Now go to the Symbology tab in the Layer Properties window for the Land Use layer. Click Import. The Import Symbology window opens. Select the first option "…from a layer file” and browse for landUse.lyr (found in /LM_04/ folder and click Add. Click OK in the Import Symbology window. The Import Symbology Matching Dialog window opens. Select ELU_TP from the Value Field list menu. Click OK.

If this worked well the Symbology tab should now look like in the image below. If it didn’t work out, follow the procedure as in step 2.2 but select only Unique values and assign symbols based on the ELU_TP field (refer to 4.21.03 for proper color coding).

2.10As you can see in the map, and from the order of the layers in the table of content, the Barangay boundaries layer covers the Land use layer (the nice palette in the land use layer cannot be seen in the map). Now, assign proper symbology for the Barangay boundaries layer – that is no fill-color (select No color and Boundary, neighborhood as outline symbol (click Properties in the Symbol Selector window and Outline in the Symbol Selector Editor window).

A tip! Since you don’t need to categorize the symbology as in step 2.2-4 here, use this shortcut: Simply double-click on the symbol next to the layer’s name in the table of content, and the Symbol Selector window will appear right away. Assign the proper symbology from here.

If you add a polygon layer such as land use/coverage or built-up areas, this should be at the bottom. Then, polyline layers such as roads and rivers can be displayed atop on the polygon layer. This is also the reason why we assigned no fill-color to the Barangay boundary layer – the boundaries will now be shown atop of the other layers, whereas the barangays’ areas (or more correct: surfaces) will be completely transparent.

2.11Verify that your layers are in a correct order (so that all features are displayed properly) and also have proper symbology. To change the order, simply drag each layer up or down in the table of content. See image below.

3 Creating a Buffer

From the map we can see that the proposed new power line will cross through urban areas and it could be interesting to analyze the negative impact on existing urban settlements. The next step is therefore to do the buffering. Creating a buffer provides a visual representation on the map of the area within a certain distance of one or more features. We can also use the buffer to select features in other layers that fall within the buffered area..

3.1In the menu bar click Tools > Customize. The Customize window opens (see image below). Go to the Commands tab and select Tools in the Categories box at the left. Click the Buffer Wizard icon in the Commands box to the right. Drag the icon and drop it in the Toolbar. Click Close.

3.2Now click the Bufferd Wizard icon that you just dropped in the toolbar (). The Buffer wizard window appears (see image below). Select The features of a layer. In the list menu below, select Transmission Lines. Click Next. [/b].

3.3Refer to the image below. Select At a specified distance and type the distance. The buffer for a 500 kV transmission line is 65 m.
Select Meters from the Distance units arelist menu. Click Next.

3.4Refer to the image below: Select Yes to Dissolve barriers between.
Select In a new layer. Specify output shapefile or feature class. Click on to define the output folder /CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA/06_Workfolder/ and type the filename ‘Transmission_lines_buffer_65m’. Click SavE then Finish.

3.5Change symbology on the Transmission_lines_buffer_65m layer to a hatching symbol. You are now done with the exercise. The result will look something like this (zoomed in a bit where the planned transmission line starts):

It seems that the alignment of the will cause impact on substantial parts of the urban settlements. If an aerial photo or a cadastre dataset would have been available it would have been quite easy to point out what lots/parcels that will be affected. Maybe it is a good idea to try an alternative route for the new transmission line?

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7.03.05 Tutorial on Creating Population Density Map

7.04 CLUP Basemap Template Tutorial

  Disclaimer

The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar with the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

  Introduction

In this exercise we will use a template to make a base map. The main purpose for the exercise is to get familiar with the tools to modify a template and populate it with data and proper accessories.
You can easily create your own template to use for your maps. It is also possible to edit an already existing template to your preferences. In this exercise, however, we will use the template prepared in the Cookbook. This template is set up for a landscape A3 print out map

By the term CLUP Basemap we understand a map for background use. When using GIS, the base map features are put under other layers that are important for a specific analysis. We use the base map (features) to make it easy for the map user to locate sites and zones according to streets, rivers, districts, etc.

1 Getting started
1.1 Open ArcMap. A popup window with three options will appear (see image below). The options are:
A new empty map
A template
An existing map

1.2 Choose A template. Then click OK.
1.3 Browse and select Basemap_Template(A3).mxt, then click Add, see image below. The file is found in the folder \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BI)\ .

1.4 The template will now appear in your workspace. Check what will happen by changing from Layout View to Data View. You can do this either by selecting View > Data View from the menu bar or by using the Data View or Layout View buttons, found at the bottom. During this tutorial you will be working in the Layout View when not otherwise noted. Change back to the Layout View.
2 Adding Data
2.1 Click on the add data button and browse for and select the following base map features:
barangay_bndry (barangay boundaries)
municipal_bndry (municipal boundaries)
Lake
Roads
Rivers

These shapefiles are found in this folder: CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BI)\. Click on Add. Now the map will appear as in the image below:

3 Saving a Map Document
3.1 In the menu bar, select File > Save As… Browse to CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA/ . Name the file basemap_v1 and make sure that the file type is ArcMap Documents. Click on Save. Don’t forget to save your progress now and then throughout the exercise.
4 Applying Symbology and Changing Names to Layers
 
It’s a very good idea that already in this step assign proper symbology to the layers that will constitute the base map. In our case, we won’t use any land cover features (e.g. land use). Due to this, there’s a risk that the map becomes too black-and-white and dull. By assigning a light color to the municipal_bndry, the areas belonging to the municipality will clearly be visible and separated from those belonging to adjacent municipalities.

It’s also a good idea to rename the default layer names (that correspond to the actual file names) to more comprehensible names.

4.1 In the table of Content, right-click on the municipal_bndry layer then select Properties. The Layer Properties window appears.
4.2 Go to the General tab. Rename municipal_bndry to ‘Municipal Boundary’. Click Apply.
4.3 Now go to the Symbology tab. Click on ---- and the Symbol Selector window appears.
4.4 Refer to the image below. In the Symbol Selector window, click on the small arrow next to Fill Color. A list box containing some colors appears (to the right in the image below). Select No Color (found at the top in the list box).

4.5 Now, still in the Symbol Selector window, click Properties. The Symbol Property Editor window appears.
4.6 Set the Outline width to 1.00. Now click Outline.
4.7 Select the Boundary, City symbol in the left of the window. (If you don’t find it, click More Symbols and select the ESRI library). Choose a dark-grey color. Click OK, then OK again.
4.8 Now, open the Layer Properties window for the Roads layer. Go to the Symbology tab.
4.9 Refer to the image below. In the Layer Properties window, click on Categories to the left and select Unique values . Select RD_CL From the Value Field list menu. Click Add All Values .

4.10 You can still refer to the image (now above). Uncheck the box in the symbol column for . Place the cursor in the Label column and delete RD_CL and rename municipal to ‘Municipal road’ and provincia to ‘Provincial road’. Click Apply. Note the changes on road symbology in the table of content.
4.11 Still in the Symbology tab of the Layer Properties window, double-click on the colored line (the actual symbol) in the symbol column in the municipal row. The Symbol Selector window opens. Select the Major Road symbol. Click OK.
4.12 Repeat step 4.11 on provincial road and select the Highway symbol.
4.13 Place the provincial road on top of the municipal road by using the arrows at the right in the Layer Properties window. Click OK.
4.14 The last thing is to assign to the symbology Barangay Layer. To do this, open the Layer Properties window for the Barangays_bndry layer. (First go to the General tab to rename the layer to ‘Barangays’.) Then go to the Symbology tab.
4.15 Follow same procedure in steps 4.4 to 4.6 but this time choose Boundary, Military Installation when selecting the outline symbol for the Barangay Boundary in step 4.6.
4.16Click Apply and OK. As you can see the Municipal boundary is not seen very well. In the list of content, arrange the layers in the following order by dragging and dropping the layers: Municipal boundary, Roads, Rivers, Lake and Barangays.
5 Setting Data Frame Properties
 
Keep in mind that a printed map must have a logical and even scale (e.g. 1:10,000; 1:25,000; 1:50,000; 1:100,000), that is a scale that makes sense and is easy to use for calculation of real-world distances. When using any template you should find such a scale that will make the map features fill the data frame as much as possible.

In our A3 template, the whole municipality will fit in a scale of 1:50,000. We don’t want to show the whole lake in the map.

5.1 Set the map scale to 1:50,000 by using the map scale selector tool, found in the toolbar.
5.2 Right-click on the Data Frame in the table of content (a top of all layers) and select Properties. The Data Frame Properties window will appear. This window contains several tags. Go to the Data Frame tab, see image below.

5.3 Select Fixed scale and verify that this is 1:50,000. Click Apply then OK. Note that the map scale selector tool and the “normal” zooming tools in the toolbar now have been disabled. Instead, you will be served by the Layout toolbar zooming tools, see image below. (If the Layout toolbar hasn’t appeared on your workspace, get it by clicking View > Toolbars > Layout. You can drag and drop it to a suitable place in the workspace.)
5.4 Use the Pan tool in the normal toolbar () to move the map to its best position in the data frame.
The Layout Pan tool () will move the whole template. The map should now look something like this:

6 Adding and Changing Text
6.1 Use the Select Elements tool (). Click on the text string that reads ‘MUNICIPALITY OF’. It should now appear in a box. This means that the text is selected. Either double-click or right-click and choose Properties. The Properties window will appear, see image below.

6.2 Make sure that you are in the Text tab. Type ‘MUNICIPALITY OF LERUAL’, then click Apply.
 
As you can see in the Properties Window, there are two tabs, Text and Size and Position. There are here a lot of text properties that can be adjusted to your personal preferences. Feel free to do that. Only a reminder! One advantage with using a template is that different maps get a similar layout. If you change a lot of properties, you better also save a new template file so that your other maps can have the same appearance.

6.3 Repeat step 6 and 7 to change the appropriate text into ‘PROVINCE OF CANTANGAS’ and ‘Region IV C'.
6.4 Go to the menu bar. Select Insert > Text. A text box appears in the data frame. Type ‘BASE MAP’, then drag it with the mouse and place it below the text stating “Legend” (we will remove this later). Make it bigger by opening the Properties window for this text. Click Change Symbol… in the Text tab and choose text size 24. Click OK then OK again. The result should be something like below:

7 Inserting map elements
 
In the Insert menu you have some options to insert different map elements. (See image below.) In this exercise we will insert a scale bar, a north arrow and a legend. All elements are easy to drag and drop wherever you want to place them in the map. It is also possible to resize and reform them by selecting a corner of an element and dragging it. Also, you can use the Properties window for each element to change it according to your preferences.


8 Inserting Scale Bar
8.1 Select Insert > Scale Bar. The Scale Bar Selector window appears. See image below.

8.2 Choose one of the scale bar types (for example scale line 1).
8.3 Click on Properties. The Scale Line Properties window opens. Here you can choose and try to find what properties could be assigned for a nice-looking scale bar.

You will get a nice scale bar in the right information column of the template by using the settings below.

8.4 Go to the Scale and Unit tab. Select the following settings (also refer to the image below):
Scale:
Number of divisions: 3
Number of subdivisions: 2
When resizing: Adjust division value.
Units:
Division Units: Kilometers
Label Position: below bar

When you’re done with this click Apply.


8.5 Go to the Numbers and Marks tab. Select the following settings in both the Numbers and the Marks section in the window (also refer to image below):

Frequency: divisions and first subdivisions.
Position: Above bar

When you’re done with this click Apply followed by OK and OK once more.


8.6 Drag the scale bar to a position similar to the one in the image below. Resize it so that you will have the marks on 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 kilometers. You can go back and change settings by right-clicking on the scale bar and selecting Properties.

9 Inserting North Arrow
9.1 From the menu bar, select Insert > North Arrow… The North Arrow Selector window opens. Select one type and feel free to change some properties. Click OK.
9.2 Drag the north arrow and place it in a similar position as shown in the image below. You can also resize it to your preferences.

10 Inserting Legend
 
You have probably already observed that a legend (together with scale text) has automatically been rendered by our template. This legend can be edited by clicking on the respective text box and dragging and dropping. You will in this step also try the alternative way to create a legend from scratch using the legend wizard. At the end of step 10 you can decide which legend you want to keep and thus delete the other one.

10.1 Now you will insert a legend. First make sure that the layers are named in a comprehensible way. (You should already have done this in step 4 above)
10.2 Select Insert > Legend… The Legend wizard appears (see image below).

10.3As default all the Map Layers (left) are automatically added to the Legend Items (right). Since we have decided to show each barangay with a separate color, we need to remove Barangays from Legend Items. Select Barangays and click on <. Sort the legend items in the following order by using the arrows (up/down) at the right:
Municipal boundary, Roads, Rivers, Lake. Click Next.
10.4 In this step of the wizard you can change some text properties. Size 16 and font Arial will work fine. Click Next.
10.5 In this step of the wizard you can edit the legend frame properties. No legend frame is however necessary. Click Next.
10.6 In this step of the wizard you can edit the legend items properties. The Patch fields refer to the size of the symbol (point, line or polygon). Click Next.
10.7 In this last step of the wizard you can edit spacing in the legend. You can choose to change the settings or use the default settings. Click Finish.
10.8 The legend is added to the map. Drag it and place it at a suitable place at the right (compare to image below). If you’re not satisfied with the appearance of the legend, you can easily edit each legend item by clicking on it. You can also delete the legend and run the wizard again from the beginning.

11 Adding and Editing Barangay Names in the Map
11.1 In the table of contents, right-click on the Barangays layer and choose Label Features. If you have the “correct” settings, the barangay names are added to the map and placed on their default positions. If not, don’t hesitate. We’ll take care of this very soon.
11.2 Open the Properties window for the layer Barangays layer. (Right-click on the layer in the table of content and choose Properties.) Select the Labels tab, see image below.

11.3 Make sure that the Label features in this layer box is selected. From the drop-down menu to the Label Field, select NAME (which is the column that contains barangay names). You might also want to change the text size to 11. Click Apply, then OK.
11.4 ArcMap places the labels automatically. You might have to improve the positions of the labels if they are overlapping each other or important features in the map. (As for example the Poblacion1-5 barangays). To be able to place labels manually, switch to the Data View (View > Data View)(refer to step 1.4 above if you forgot how). Right-click anywhere in the map and select Convert labels to annotations. A window with the same name appears, see image below.

11.5 Set the following In the Convert labels to annotations window (also see image above).
Select In the map.
Select All features.
Make sure that you have the Barangay boundaries layer. (If not, you need to exit the window and make sure that only this layer is set to label features.)
Select Convert unplaced labels to unplaced annotations. Click Convert.
11.6 You might have to perform the drag and drop procedures in the Data view. Use the Select Elements tool ()
Adjust the annotations (the Barangay names) that need a better position by selecting, dragging and dropping them. You can also edit the font and size (and divide a name into two rows) separately by double-clicking on each annotation for the Properties window. Switch to the Layout view () now and then to verify how it turns out.
12 Inserting an Index Map
12.1 Go the menu bar. Select Insert > Data Frame. A new data frame will appear on the map.
12.2 Drag the new data frame to the index map box in the template. Resize it so that it fits in the box.
12.3 In the table of content, rename this new data frame to ‘Index Map’. (You could also remain the existing data frame to ‘Base Map Lerual’.) To do this, right-click on the data frame, choose Properties and the General tab and type the new name.
12.4 Click on to add the following layers to the Index Map data frame:
Adj_municipalities
Lake
Municipal_bndry
They are all found in this folder: CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BI)\.
12.5 Assign suitable color by opening the Symbology Selector window. (Refer to step 3.1-6 if you forgot how). The Lake layer ought to be assigned a lake-blue color. Assign a light grey color to the Municipal_polygon layer. This is done to highlight Lerual municipality in the index map for the sake of easier orientation for the map user.
13 Adding a Grid to the Map
13.1 Open the Data Frame Properties window for the Base Map Lerual data frame. (Refer to step 5.2 if you don’t remember how to do this.) Go to the Grids tab. Click New Grid… The Grids and Graticules wizard opens.

13.2 Select Graticule: divides map by meridians and parallels. Click Next.
13.3 This is the Create a graticule step: Select Tick marks and labels. Enter the intervals 0°2’0” for both latitude and longitude. Click Next.

13.4 No changes are necessary in Axes and Labels step. Click Next.
13.5 Create a graticule. Select Place a simple border at edge of graticule and Store as fixed grid that updates with changes to the data frame. Click Finish.
13.6 Back in the Data frame Properties window, click Apply, then OK.
14 Finalizing the Map Design and Composition
14.1 The last step will be to arrange all the elements so that you are satisfied with the result. (For example, enlarge the scale text, delete or changed default text in the text boxes at bottom-right of the template. At the end your design and styling of the map it could look like this:

  If you have a map similar to the one above you have completed the exercise. Congratulations!

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7.05 Socio-economic Sector Tutorial

7.05.01 Education

 Disclaimer

The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar with the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

 Introduction

The Output map of this tutorial is a map showing the physical condition of the schools in the area and a 1000 meters buffer around the schools, illustrating the schools catchments area.

All map layers are presumed to have been digitized, projected and georeferenced before proceeding to this tutorial.

1 Getting started
1.1 Open ArcMap, select a new empty map. You will now save the map file. Click on File>Save as… in the menu bar. Browse to the folder C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\ and type ‘Educational_v1.mxd’. Click Save/OK.
1.2 Add the files………. . Click on the add data button and browse to C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BI and select the files.
Barangay_bndry
Lakes
Municipal_bndry
Roads
Rivers

Click OK.

Click on the add data button and browse to C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\01_SE and select the files.

SE19_SchTp2007
SE20_SchCap2007
Click OK. (See image below.)

2 Joining the tables
 
We are now going to join the table containing the schools (SE19) with the table containing the physical condition of the schools (SE20). Both these tables have one column in common and that is the SCH_ID column. We are joining these two tables based on this.

2.1 In the layer menu right click on the school layer, select Joins and Relates>Join… In the field “What do you want to join to this layer?”, mark Join attributes from a table
2.2 In the field “Choose the field in this layer that the join will be based on”, mark SCH_ID
2.3 In the field “Choose the table to join to this layer, or load the table from disk”, mark SchCapYr1
2.4 In the field “Choose the field in the table to base the join on:”, mark SCH_ID
2.5 Press the Ok button
2.6 Open up the attribute table of the school layer to see if the two tables have joined correctly. If they have done this, your attribute table should look like the one below.


3 Making selection by attributes
 In this example we are analyzing the following aspects of the educational sector: Schools in fair, poor or critical condition.
 The schools physical condition
Since none of the schools in the area are in critical condition, we only have to make two layers. One that contains schools in fair physical condition, and a second layer that contains schools in poor physical condition. To do this you have to do the following query.
3.1 Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
3.2 The layer that we are making our selection from is the school layer. In the operator window type "SchCapYr1.SCH_CON" = 'Poor'
3.3 Press the Apply button
3.4 In the layer menu right click on the school layer, then > Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features.
3.5 Rename the newly created layer Schools in poor physical condition. The symbol for the new layer should be a yellow square
3.6 Repeat step 1-5 but change the operator window to "SchCapYr1.SCH_CON" = 'fair' in number 2. The symbol for schools in fair physical condition should be a green square

When you have created the two new layers your screen should look like the one below.

4 Buffering
 In this example we assume that the catchments areas of the schools are 1000 meters and therefore we create a circular buffer around the schools with a radius of 1000 meters.
4.1 Open the Buffer Wizard >The features of a layer.
4.2 The selected layer is SE19_SchTp2007
4.3 Press the next button.


4.4 Set the distance units to Meters.
4.5 Set the distance to 1000 meters in the bullet “At a specified distance
4.6 Press the next button
4.7 In the “buffer output type” mark yes to the question “Dissolve barriers between”.
4.8 In the bullet “specify output shapefile or feature class” as C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\01_SE _1000meter_buffer_of _schools
4.9 Press the Finish button


5 Presentation
 The final step is to present the results of the analysis. The final products should be effectively communicating the findings to your audience. In most cases, the results of the GIS analysis can best be shown on a map.
Charts and reports of selected data are two other ways of presenting the results. Charts and reports can be printed separately, be embedded in the CLUP narrative text or be placed on a map.

The education analysis layers will be put on top of the Base Map. As recommended in Volume two, it is be overlaid with the population density map to show distribution of schools with respect to the number of people residing within an area:

A zoomed screenshot of the map.

Ver 1.0


7.06 Infrastructure Sector Tutorial

Disclaimer: The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar with the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done in a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

Introduction

The objectives of this exercise are to get more familiar to some basic ArcGIS operations. We will create shapefiles, work with attribute data in Excel, digitize features to a new shapefile and join attributes to a shapefile.

The scenario of this exercise is that we will prepare an analysis based on road data to identify the bottlenecks of a road leading from the transport corridor at the municipal boundary where a major new settlement is located to the poblacion at the lake.

It should be noted that the procedure (digitizing an already digitized feature) in the tutorial is very unlikely to be used in real GIS applications. Rather, the existing road layer would be broken down in segments constituting a network, and the attribute data would be joined to the original, but modified, dataset. Constructing networks in ArcGIS is however an advanced task and a precondition is that the software is expanded to include network extension applications.

1 Getting started
1.1 Open ArcMap. Select A new empty map.
1.2 Add the following layers to the workspace:
Barangays_bndry
Roads

The first file is found in C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BI\ and the two other files are all found in the \02_IS\ folder.

1.3 Assign proper symbology to the layers and rename them in the list of content. Since we will digitize the road layers, assign a line symbol with a rather large width (e.g. 3,0). See image below. To start changing the symbology, either double-click on the layer symbol in the table of content or open the Layer Properties window and select the Symbology tab.

1.4 In the menu bar click File > Save As… to save a map document as road_analysis_v1 in C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\. Don’t forget to save your progress now and then throughout the exercise.
2 Creating a shapefile
2.1 Open ArcCatalog (click on in the ArcMap tool bar).
2.2 In the catalog tree, navigate to the C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\02_IS\ folder. In the menu bar click File > New > Shapefile… The Create New Shapefile window appears.
2.3 Type the Name ‘RdAnalysis’ and select Polyline as Feature Type. See image below.

2.4 Assign the same coordinate system as the RdMun layer. First click Edit… to open the Spatial Reference Properties window. Click Import, browse for the RdMun layer and click OK. See image below.

2.5Click OK in the Spatial Reference Properties window. Click OK in the Create New Shapefile window. The new shapefile is created.
3 Digitizing
 
We will use GIS to show road segments that are in a critical or poor condition or have an inadequate width compare to road classification standards. The road will be digitized in segments where the nodes are defined at barangay crossings (so that the analysis can be used for comparisons between the barangays) and intersections with other roads (so network analyses can be made). In step 1.2 we added those files with road features and barangay boundaries to the workspace and we can thus proceed.

A good way to generate the road condition data is to print a map and use the paper map to make a sketch where the nodes should be located which will be the road segments before you start with the screen digitizing. Then the actual conditions of these road segments could then be verified in the field before it is digitized. A unique numerical ID will also have to be written and assigned in the sketch as to make field surveying and filing up the information easier and would also allow to easily assigned to corresponding ID to features that will be digitized.

3.1 Go back to the ArcMap window. (If you have closed it, you can start it again by clicking on in the ArcCatalog toolbar. If this is the case you also have to open the map document road_analysis_v1.mxd.)
3.2 Now it is time to add the shapefile we prepared for the analysis of the road condition. Click on and browse for RdAnalysis.shp. Click Add.

Nothing is seen on the map although the RdAnalysis layer is activated to be shown. The reason for this of course that no roads have yet been digitized into the layer. If you open the attribute table to the shapefile, you will find it empty, compare to image below. Now it’s time to start digitizing.

3.3 If it’s not already visible, you need to open the Editor toolbar. In the menu bar click Tools > Editor. The Editor toolbar appears. Drag and drop it to a suitable place in the workspace (e.g. within the toolbar).
3.4 In the Editor toolbar, click Editor > Start editing. See image below.

3.5Make sure that the settings are set to Create New Features and that the target layer is RdAnalysis. Click ???
3.6Set the snapping properties so that your digitizing effort will snap to vertices, along the line and the endpoints of both the RDAnalys_V1 and Roads layers and the edge of Barangay layer. In the editor menu, click Editor > Snapping… The Snapping Options appears between the table of content and your map (see image below). Select (check the corresponding box) according to what is mentioned above. You can now close the Snapping Options.

The plan is now to digitize as indicated below. A RdAnalysis line segment’s nodes will be at changes in road condition, crossings with barangay boundaries or intersections with other roads. For this exercise, we will assume that the changes in road condition falls directly within the intersection of the road with barangay boundary and road other roads. Note also that the ID used is just the order of roads that are to be digitized (top to bottom) and sequential numbering is used to make the exercise simpler.

3.7 Zoom in to segment 1 to a scale about 1:15000 or use the scale selector and the pan tool. (Now it will be easier to digitize.)
3.8 Refer to the image below. Start (click once) at the barangay boundary and follow the road and click again after a small section. Continue to click once at points along the road. End at the crossing of the road leading south by double-clicking to finalize the road segment. The result is shown in the second image below:



3.9 Assign another symbology to the RdAnalysis layer, so that your digital effort is clearly seen in the map. Choose for example a red and wide line symbol.

If you are not pleased with the result, use the redo button before you proceed with the next segment. Also get into the habit of saving (2) your work often. When you are finished or need to proceed with another GIS operation you should stop editing (1). Refer to image below.

3.10 Repeat step 3.8 on the other segments. Follow the order given in the sketch image just before step 3.7 above. When you’re done with this, your map should look something like this.

3.11 Click Editor > Stop Editing.
4 Assigning Road Segment ID to Conform with Attributes in the dBase File
4.1 Don’t close the editor. Open the attribute table by right-clicking on RdAnalysis in the list of content and selecting Open Attribute Table. The Attributes of RdAnalysis window appears. See image below. If you have followed the sketch above you should have ten segments in the table, each with its unique FID number. There is also another Id column that has zeros at the moment but needs to be identified in order to connect it with the attributes in the Excel/dBase tables.

4.2 So what ID should we give the segments? Well, there could be different alternatives. Here, we need to use the IDs that are found in the dBase file. decide to use the PSDG number of the barangay where the road segment is situated to give it its unique ID number. To facilitate we insert a name label for the barangays. In the table of content, right-click on the barangay boundary layer and select Properties.
4.3 The Layer Properties window appears (see image below). Go to the Labels tab. Select Label features in this layer. From the list menu to Label field select NAME. Click OK.

The result will look something like the image below and you see that in this case the road passes the barangays of Niyugan, As-is, Poblacion 1 and Poblacion 4.
The first segment is situated in a barangay named Niyugan, which has a barangay ID (0)1. We assume that we do not need to divide a road into more than 99 segments in a barangay. As this segment is the first we give it the unique ID of 101.

4.4 Make sure that you are still in editing mode. (If not choose Editor > Start Editing from the editor toolbar.) Return to or open the attribute table (refer to step 4.1 if needed).
4.5 Place the cursor in the first row in the Id column in the Attributes of RdAnalysis table window. Click once and type 1401 for FID0. (Since As-is barangay ID is 14 and this constitutes the first road segment in barangay.)
4.6 Providing that you digitized the same segments in the same order as in the sketch above, repeat step 4.5 on the other rows and assign Id according to the table/image below:.

4.7 Click Editor > Save Editing.
4.8 Also make sure to save the map document road_analysis_v1 by either clicking on in the toolbar or selecting File > Save in the menu bar.
5 Converting the Attribute Excel File to dBase Format
 
We will now work on the dBase Table with additional attribute data of the road. (This data has been captured on ground within a field survey and entered into an excel file.) When working with Excel, it is always recommended that ArcMap is closed (and vice versa). This is due to avoid accessing the same files from the two programs, which can lead to quite some problems. If you have a printed sketch map with the segments, also add the new Id numbers onto this map.

5.1 Close ArcMap. Open Excel.
5.2 Open the file IS01_RdTp2007.xls found in C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\02_IS\. (See image below where, for example, the road segment with ID 101 is municipal road, has a gravel surface and is in a poor condition.

5.3 Select (highlight) the cells that will be found in the dBase file. (Place the cursor in cell B2 and drag it to cell H12.) From the excel menu bar, select Edit > Copy.
5.4 Open a new file. (Go to File > New then select New empty document.) Place the cursor in cell A1 and select Edit > Paste. See image below.

5.5 The head column must be in one line in dBase format. Select the cells constituting the column head (A1:G1). From the menu bar select Format > Column > AutoFit Selection.
5.6 Only one sheet is allowed in dBase. Remove Sheet 2 by right-clicking on the Sheet2 tab and selecting Delete. (See image below.) Repeat this procedure on Sheet 3:

5.7 Select only the cells with data (A1:G9). Select File > Save as…
5.8 In the Save As window, browse for the folder C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\02_IS\ and type the File name IS01_RdTp2007.dbf. From the Save as type menu list, select the DBF 4 (dBASE IV) (*dbf) option. Click Save.
5.9 Now a couple of alerts will appear one after each other. Simply click OK to the alert as below:

5.10 Click Yes to the alert below:

5.11 Click the exit button (1) and Yes (2) below.

5.12 Click OK again

5.13 Finally, click Yes.

5.14 Close Excel.
 
It’s always recommended to have Excel closed when you work with ArcGIS.
If you want to revise a .dbf file you should close ArcGIS before you open Excel.

6 Joining the dBase File to the Shapefile
6.1 Open ArcMap and the map document road_analysis_v1.
6.2 In the table of content, right-click on RdAnalysis and select Joins and Relates > Join… (see image below).

6.3 The Join Data window appears. (See image below.) You should have the following settings:
1.’ Id’ was the column head where you inserted the unique Ids for the road segments
2. ‘IS01_RdYr’ is the name of the dBase table you have prepared that contains the attribute information of the road segments.
3. RD_ID is the name of the column where the unique ID have been inserted
4. Click OK.

7 Viewing the Result of the Analysis
7.1 Open the attribute table for the RdAnalysis layer. As you can see, the columns from the dBase table have been intergrated.
7.2 To make the table easier to read we need to hide some columns and give proper alias. Open the Layer Properties window and go to the Fields tab.
7.3 Place the cursor on the first row (RDAnalysis.FID). This is ArcGIS’s column with little information value for us. Therefore, unselect the Visible box. (See image below.)

7.4 Repeat step 7.3 for the consecutive fields. If a field is selected visible, you should assign a more understandable Alias.
Set the following fields to be visible and assign the respective alias:
IS01_Rd_ - ‘Road Segment ID’
ISO1_Rd_ - ‘Road Classification’
Etc…
  You have completed the exercise! Well done.
You can now think of different ways to present the analysis. Test the “interactive presentation” by using the Identify tool on the Rd_analysis layer. Since you’ve set the fields display properties above and thus reduced redundant and unnecessary information, the result will be fairly easy to interpret for a “normal” computer user.

Ver 1.0


7.07 Environment Sector Tutorial

Ver 1.0


7.07.01 Flooding Tutorial

 Disclaimer The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar with the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

Introduction
The Output map of this tutorial is a map showing all flooding hazards. This layer will be useful when you are making your hazards analysis later on.

All map layers are presumed to have been digitized, projected and georeferenced before proceeding to this tutorial.

1 Getting started
1.1 Open ArcMap, select a new empty map. You will now save the map file. Click on File>Save as… in the menu bar. Browse to the folder C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\06_Workfolder\ and type ‘Flooding_v1.mxd’. Click Save/OK.
1.2 Add the files……….. to ArcMap. . Click on the add data button and browse to C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BM and select the file.

barangays_bndry

Lake

municipal_bndry

Rivers

Roads

Click OK.

Click on the add data button and browse to C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\03_EN and select the file.

EN03_Fld

Click OK. (See image below.)

The shape file that contains the flooding also contains areas that are not affected by these hazards, see the picture below.

If geohazards map is the source of flooding data, then all flooding indicated will be used as restriction. If other sources are used, where several degrees of flooding are specified, then you have to single out the areas that are severely flooded. In this example we use map with several degrees of flooding.


2 Making selection by attributes

For this example we assume that areas that are hit by “Moderate seasonal flooding”, “Severe seasonal flooding” and “Waterlogged” are not suitable for future urban development.
We have to make one new layer that contains the areas with “Moderate seasonal flooding”, “Severe seasonal flooding” and “Waterlogged”.

2.1Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
2.2 The layer that we are making our selection from is EN03_Fld In the operator window type "FLD_TP" = 'Moderate flooding'.


2.3 Press the Apply button
2.4 In the method column. Change to “Add to current selection”.
2.5 Change the operator window to " FLD_TP " = 'Severe flooding'
2.6 Press the Apply button
2.7 Change the operator window to "FLD_TP" = 'waterlogged'
2.8 Press the Apply button.
3 Create a new layer for the selected features
3.1 In the layer menu right click on the floodinghazard layer, then > Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features.
3.2 Rename the newly created layer floodinghazard selection

3.3 Remove the EN03_fld layer
4 Save the floodinghazardselection layer as a shapefile

To be able to use the layer containing the selected types of floodinghazards in another template, you have to save the layer as a shapefile.

4.1 In the layer menu right click on the floodinghazardselection layer,then > Data> Export Data.

4.2 Chose “All features” in the Export field
4.3 Mark the “Use the same Coordinate system as this layer’s source data” bullet.
4.4 In the row “specify output shapefile or feature class” save as C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\03_EN \floodinghazardselection

4.5 In the “Save as type”, chose shapefile
4.6 Press the save button
4.7 Press the Ok button
4.8 You will be given a question if you want to add the exported data to the map as a layer. Press No.

The shapefile that you just created containing the unsuitable flooding areas are going to be used when you create the geohazards layer.

Ver 1.0


7.07.02 Erosion Tutorial

 Disclaimer

Disclaimer: The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar to the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.
Introduction

Introduction

The Output map of this tutorial is a map showing hazards caused by erosion. This layer will be useful when you are making your hazards analysis later on.

All map layers are presumed to have been digitized, projected and georeferenced before proceeding to this tutorial

1 Getting started

1.1 Open ArcMap, select a new empty map. You will now save the map file. Click on File>Save as… in the menu bar. Browse to the folder C:\ CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\06_Workfolder \ and type ‘Erosion_v1.mxd’. Click Save/OK.
1.2 Click on the add data button and browse to C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BM and select the files:

barangays_bndry

Lake

municipal_bndry

Rivers

Roads

Click OK.

Click on the add data button and browse to C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BM and select the file:

EN04_Erosn

Click OK. (See image below.)

The shape file that contains the erosion hazards also contains areas that are not affected by these hazards, see the screenshot below.

2 Making selection by attributes

In this example we assume that areas that are affected by moderate and severe erosion are not suitable for future urban development.

We have to make a new layer that contains the areas with no moderate and severe erosion.
The erosion hazard layer contains “no apparent erosion, slight erosion, moderate erosion and severe erosion”. We will have to make a new layer that contains moderate and severe erosion

2.1 Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
2.2 The layer that we are making our selection from is EN04_Erosn. In the operator window type "EROSN_TP" = 'Moderate erosion”.
2.3 Press the Apply button.
2.4 In the method column. Change to “Add to current selection”.
Change the operator window to “EROSN_TP" = 'Severe erosion'

2.5 Press the Apply button.

3 Create a new layer for the selected features

3.1 In the layer menu right click on the erosionhazard layer, then> Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features.
3.2 Rename the newly created layer erosion hazard selection
3.3 Remove the EN04_Erosn layer

4 Save the erosionhazardselection layer as a shapefile

To be able to use the layer containing the selected types of floodinghazards in another template, you have to save the layer as a shapefile.

4.1 In the layer menu right click on the erosionhazardselection layer,then > Data> Export Data.
4.2 Chose “All features” in the Export field
4.3Mark the “Use the same Coordinate system as this layer’s source data” bullet
4.4 In the row “specify output shapefile or feature class” save as C:\ \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\03_EN\erosionhazardselection

In the “Save as type”, chose shapefile

4.5 Press the save button
4.6 Press the Ok button
4.7 You will be given a question if you want to add the exported data to the map as a layer. Press [/b]No


Ver 1.0


7.07.03 Faultlines

7.07.04 Hazard Tutorial

7.09 How to Create the Needs Analysis Layer

7.10 Risk and Suitability Analysis Tutorial

Disclaimer

The objective of this tutorial is to get familiar to the GIS software. The tutorial only covers some parts that are being done In a real analysis. The results that are being displayed in the tutorial can’t be compared with the results a real analysis would generate.

Introduction

The Output map of this tutorial is a map showing the Suitable Areas for Future Urban Development shown below.

All map layers are presumed to have been digitized, projected and georeferenced before proceeding to this R&S tutorial.

1 Getting started

1.1 Open ArcMap, select a new empty map. You will now save the map file. Click on File>Save as… in the menu bar. Browse to the folder C:\ \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\06_Workfolder and type ‘risk_and_suitability_v1.mxd’. Click Save/OK
1.2 Click on the add data button and browse to C:\ \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\00_BM and select the files:
barangays_bndry
Lake
municipal_bndry
Rivers
Roads
Click OK.
Click on the add data button and browse to C:\ \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\03_EN and select the file:
Hazards_total
Click OK.
Click on the add data button and browse to C:\ \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\04_LM and select the files:
LM04_Cl (land classification)
LM07_Safdz
Click OK. (See image below.)

2 Categorizing the land classification layer

2.1 The land classification layer has to be categorized.
2.2 In the table of contents, double click on the LM04_Cl > Symbology >Categories.
2.3 Choose “Unique values”
2.4 In the “Value Field” chose “CL_TP
2.5 Press the “Add all values” button
2.6 Press the Apply button
2.7 Press the Ok button

3 Making the Alienable and Disposable layer

We are interested in the areas that are alienable and disposable. Making the layer that contains this information. The following steps have to be conducted.

3.1 Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
3.2 The layer that we are making our selection from is the landclass layer. In the operator window type "CL_TP" = 'Alienable & Disposable'

3.3 Press the Apply button
3.4 In the layer menu right click on the LM04_Cl, then> Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features

3.5Rename the newly created layer alienable and disposable

4 Saving the alienable and disposable layer that you have created as a layer file

4.1 In the layer menu, right click on the layer alienable and disposable>Save As Layer File
4.2 Name the layer alienableanddisposable.lyr
4.3 Press the Save button

5 The Slope layer

In this tutorial we have access to the land classification layer. Assessments’ regarding the slope has already been considered within the classification procedure for the alienable and disposable land. Therefore we don’t have to add the slope layer to the analysis. However if you don’t have access to the land classification layer, the slope layer is a crucial part of the risk and suitability analysis.

6 The Air- and Water pollution layer

We have not included the air- and water pollution layer in this tutorial. However it’s not recommended to neglect these hazards when you are doing a risk and suitability analysis in real life. See chapter4.08.07 for more information.

7 Ancestral domain

We have not included the ancestral domain areas in this tutorial. However this is also a factor you have to consider when you are doing a risk and suitability analysis in real life. For further information regarding Ancestral domain, see chapter 4.09.05

8 SAFDZ layer

8.1 Open up the SAFDZ layer. The layer contains Agro-Forestry Zone, Agusan River, Built-up areas, Crop Development zone, Fishery development zone, Remaining NPAAAD and Watershed/Forestry zone.

The only one that is fully protected and therefore not suitable for future development is the “Remaining NPAAAD”. The next step is to create a layer that only contains the “Remaining NPAAAD”.

8.2 Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
8.3 The layer that we are making our selection from is the landclass layer. In the operator window type "SAFDZ_TP" = '8 - Remaining NPAAAD'

8.4 Press the Apply button
8.5 In the layer menu right click on the SAFDZ layer, then > Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features
8.6 Rename the newly created layer Remaining NPAAAD

9 Unite all the layers that are unsuitable for future development

The next step is to union all the layers that are unsuitable for future development in to one layer. The reason why we do this is that the final step will be to union this layer with the A&D layer and then delete those areas of the A&D layer that are unsuitable.

9.1 Open up the ArcToolbox window , then Analysis tools >Overlay >Union.
9.2 Double click on Union and a window like the one below should pop up.
9.3 In output features select the layers “hazards_total” and “remaining NPAAAD”.
9.4 In the field Output Feature Class, name the output file unsuitable areas_total

10 Adding an extra field in the newly created table

The reason for this is to make it easier later on when you union the layer that contains all the unsuitable areas with the A&D layer and then filter out those A&D areas that are affected by unsuitable areas.

10.1 In the layer menu, right click on the layer unsuitable areas__total, then >Open attribute table
10.2 Click on options > Add Field

10.3 Name the field Unsuit. Type=Text and Length=3

10.4 Right click on the header of the Unsuit column, then >Calculate Values.

A window pops up informing that you are about to do a calculate outside of an edit session and asks if you wish to continue. Press yes to continue.

10.5 In the operator window, type the word “yes

10.6Press the Ok button

11 Unite the alienable and disposable layer with the layer that contains all the unsuitable areas

The next step is to create a layer that contains the A&D areas that is not affected by the unsuitable areas.

11.1 Open up the ArcToolbox window , then Analysis tools >Overlay >Union.
11.2 Double click on Union and a window like the one below should pop up.
11.3 In output features select the layers ”unsuitable areas__total” and “Alienable & disposable
11.4 In the field Output Feature Class, name the output file unsuitable areas__and_AandD

12 Select those areas that is alienable and disposable and that is not affected by areas that are not suitable for future urban development

When you have made a layer that both contains the unsuitable areas and the A&D areas. You want to select those areas that are A&D and not unsuitable. To do this the following query has to be made:

12.1 Open the selection menu >selection by attribute
12.2 The layer that we are making our selection from is unsuitable areas__and_AandD. In the operator window type "CL_TP" = 'Alienable & Disposable' AND “unsuit” <> ‘yes’.

12.3 Press the Apply button
12.4 As you can see the query is dependent of two criteria’s. The first is that it is Alienable & Disposable. And the second is that the area is not unsuitable. The <> means not. So in plain text the query above says that the selected areas will be A&D and not unsuitable.

13 Create a new layer for the selected features

13.1 In the layer menu right click on the unsuitable areas_and_AandD layer, then> Selection >Create Layer From Selected Features.
13.2 Rename the newly created layer Suitable areas for future urban development
13.3 Now you have made a layer that only contains A&D areas that is not affected by unsuitable areas. When you put this layer on top of the base map layer, your map should look like the one below.

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7.11 Tutorial on How to Apply Recommended Color-Coding to a Draft CLUP

Introduction

In this tutorial, which is to be used at the Applied Training, we will use the existing land use dataset (LM01) since no data have been prepared for the CLUP dataset (LM02).

This tutorial deals with simple operations such as changing symbology and colors. The output will be a draft CLUP containing the recommended colors.

1 Getting started
1.Open ArcMap and add the LM01_ExiLu.shp layer to the workspace. It is found in the folder C:\CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\04_LM\

The red-green-color coding (RGB) is handy to work with on computers, since most programs define colors as a mixture of these three colors. In ArcGIS those codes are accessible through a special Color Selection Window. The complete recommended color-coding is found in Annex 4-3 of Volume 1. Below follows an extract from the Annex.

1.2 In the table of content, right-click on LM01_ExiLu, then select Properties. On your screen the Layer Properties window will appear. Select the Symbology tab.
1.3 See image below. Click on Categories at the left and select Unique values. From the Value Field list menu select ELU_TP. Click Add All Values.

1.4 Uncheck the symbol for . Place the cursor over the word ELU_TP in the Label-column. Click once. You can now edit the label to 'Land Use Category'. Click Apply, then OK. Verify that your screen looks like below (don’t mind if the color scale is different):
1.5Save a map document. Click File > Save as in the menu bar. Name the new file ‘draft_clup_v1’ and save it in the \CLUP_EXERCISE_DATA\06_Workfolder\ folder. Don’t forget to save your progress now and then throughout the exercise.
2Assigning Recommended Colors
2.1 Now we will assign the correct color to the first category.
Open the Layer Properties window, Symbology tab. Right-click on AGRICULTURAL and click Properties for selected Symbol(s). The Symbol Selector window will open. In the Options box click on the small arrow next to Fill color (see image below):

2.2 Then select More colors… at the bottom. Now the Color Selector window opens (see image below). Type in the RGB code for Agriculture “0,150,0” or use the selector bar arrows. Then click OK and OK once more.

2.3Repeat the same procedure in step 2.1 and 2.2. For each category, assign the color according to the recommended palette in Annex 4-3. Your table of content and workspace should now look like this:

3Arranging Categories
3.1You can now arrange the land use categories in a better order. Open the Layer Properties window, go to the Symbology tab. Simply use the arrows at the right of the categories to move one category up or down. Follow the order given by Annex 4-3. Your table of content should after this have the same appearance as shown in image below:

4Assigning Symbology

If you have studied the Annex 4-3, forest and water use areas will have the same color for sub-categories. However, it’s recommended to separate categories with symbols. This is also the recommendation for the different forest areas.
4.1Open the Layer Properties window and go to the Symbology tab. Right-click on Mangrove Forest and select Properties for selected Symbol(s)… The Symbol Selector window will now open. Click on Properties. The Symbol Properties Editor window appears.
4.2 In the Type list menu, select Picture Fill Symbol. See image below.

4.3 Click OK. Now browse and select the mangrove bitmap file. If ArcGIS did not take you to the correct folder at once, the path is usually something like C:\Program Files\ArcGIS\Bin\Styles\. Click OK.
4.4See image below. Now select “Grey 70%” as foreground color. Click on the small arrow beside Foreground color and select the color in the first column’s third row from the bottom. If you use the Color Selector, the RGB code is 78,78,78.
4.5Now, make sure that the Background Color is set on RGB '175,215,230'. Click OK to close the Symbol Property Editor window.
4.6Click OK.
Do you read this and have completed all the steps above? You are finished with the exercise. Well done!

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